Enterprise Content Management is No Joke

Enterprise Content Management is No Joke


Posted on March 2018


Frank: Hey Doug, what are you working on?
Doug: I'm writing a newsletter article about enterprise content management and I want to make it interesting.
Frank: Why don't you add some relevant humor? People always like a good laugh.
Doug: Good idea Frank. "Hey Google.... Tell me a joke about Content Management."
Google Home: Alright, Doug, here's one....... The Past, the Present, and the Future walked into a bar to talk about Content Management.........It was tense!
Doug: That's a funny one.
Frank: Why is that funny?
Doug: I'll explain.

The Past

In the past, people wrote "stuff" by hand. They used pictures on cave walls, then handwriting with printing or cursive. Later on, typewriters (a.k.a manual printers) were used to create better-looking and more useful text. The written information was often printed on paper and stored in file cabinets. It was moved between readers in different locations by physical mail.

The Present

Most writing is now accomplished on a computer with the content saved and transmitted digitally. Some digital content is converted to HTML which is a format mark-up used to make it look better and be more accessible on the Web. Technical writers are highly skilled, trained in structured authoring with an increasingly large array of technical tools available. For important content, especially Technical Publications, there is content management. Content management is most often implemented with a base architecture called XML with shared repositories, metadata, managed workflow, and single source publishing. On average, it costs thousands of dollars per person to implement all of these technologies in Tech Pubs. For the rest of the organization, there are personal computers, but not much of this expensive technology. Besides, most enterprise authors have performance metrics that do not involve deep learning about technology or XML.

The Future

In the future content management will be ubiquitous across the enterprise. Content management will include all the functions presently available in Tech Pubs and organizational productivity will increase. Customers and internal staff will get just the right amount of information, when they need it, on whatever device they like, in their chosen language. Average incremental Implementation costs will be a few hundred dollars per staff member for everything.

It is Tense

It is tense because large organizations see the benefits of enterprise content management. However, when they extrapolate the costs of what they have already spent on incremental staff, technology, consultants, and training--in Tech Pubs to the broader enterprise,-- their C-Level executives get upset stomachs and say, "NO". It is tense because organizations are stuck in a world of great-looking PDF documents that are static. It is tense because enterprise content is not tagged with useful metadata. Everyone knows that customers and internal staff can benefit from better information, but the costs of this across the enterprise have been prohibitive. Frank: That is not so funny, Doug! Doug: Well, Frank, the joke is quite funny until you apply it to enterprise content management and unpack the tense piece. That is precisely where Simply XML sees an emerging and bright future. High performing, financially successful organizations recognize that:

Frank: That is not so funny, Doug!

Doug: Well, Frank, the joke is quite funny until you apply it to enterprise content management and unpack the tense piece. That is precisely where Simply XML sees an emerging and bright future. High performing, financially successful organizations recognize that:

Frank: That's no joke, Doug. Nice job. Do you want a cookie?